March 7, 2017

Stridepost Family Motivation Game


I wanted to share with you Stridepost, a new family motivation app for today’s technology-driven families. They are launching this week with a 21 Day Motivation Game. I like the idea that it is a simple, fun way to reward your kids n getting them motivated to do chores. Your children Kids use technology more than ever, so why not use this as an advantage to bring your family together, while staying organized and getting things done.

Stridepost’s four main features not only help to keep your kids motivated and excited to complete tasks, but also your whole family organized and on the same page:


  • Allowance & Rewards Tracker – Set points or an allowance budget for your kids to work toward as they check off their to-dos. Each task completed earns points, and on Sundays, these points are deposited into kids’ accounts. Kids can redeem points for things you agree upon.
  • To-do List Tracker – Keep track of your kids’ and family tasks while teaching kids how to prioritize their responsibilities to develop strong management skills.
  • Family Wall – All members of your family can communicate in one place through private in-app messages.
  • Online Family Calendar – Use the master Online Family Calendar. You can even import a Google Calendar or iCal into Stridepost’s Family Calendar!


Now through June 15, families can participate and enter the Family Motivation Game. The winning family will receive a Family Fun Pack valued at $300, which will include gift cards for a family night out, including a special activity and dinner. So what are you waiting for, improve your family communication and organization while having fun, with special daily challenges. I know I am excited to see my kids play (even if they can't win!).

To enter, sign up for Stridepost online for a free 90-day trial. Parents will need to can download the Stridepost Parents app (iOS and Android) and while adding the Stridepost Kids app (iOS and Android). to the devices their children use!

March 2, 2017

Free Spring Movies

Free movies are a wonderful thing. They give us something to do when spring is muddy and gray. Weekends, through April 2, your family can enjoy free movies at local Goodrich Quality Theaters. Showtimes will be available the Tuesday before and tickets are only available at the door. Tickets for adults are just $1 but kids 12 and under get free admission to the movies!

In Ann Arbor, that gives us a choice of two theaters for free movies this spring:

Goodrich Quality 16
3686 Jackson Rd., Ann Arbor

Goodrich Canton 7
43555 Ford Road, Canton Twp.



Trolls (PG) – March 11 & 12 
Middle School (PG) – March 18 & 19 
Storks (PG) – March 25 & 26 
Sing (PG) – April 1 & 2

It's hard to pass up a free movie no matter how much concession stand goodies you purchase. So one of these cold, wet or dreary late winter early spring weekends, be sure to sneak out with the kids and enjoy your free movie!





February 13, 2017

Valentine From Mom

It's been a little bit of a tough winter for me. Some of you know, but I lost my mom last fall. She had a terminal cancer so we expected death, but not like that. The year before her death, she was in and out of the hospital several times then had a stroke in August. A month later she passed away from an unknown reason.

I knew she would die. I knew she would die sooner rather than later. Given all of her illness that last year, I suspected we would loose her sooner than anticipated. The night before she passed though, I had her out to dinner and had a lovely night with her. I would not guess that by 2:00 the next day she would be dead. That was the difficult part.

My birthday passed, then the holidays and finally her birthday. It likely did not help that we had little to no sun in January either. I thought I did well, but still felt her loss deeply.

I can't be the only person who has lost a parent, that talks to that parent. In fact, in mentioning that, I found out that most people talk to their deceased parent. I talk to her mainly when it is quiet, and when I am alone. Like when I talk a walk at night or when driving alone in the car. 

In the last couple days though, there have been several times where I just wanted to pick up the phone and talk to mom. I wanted to share a little story about my daughter or share my son's latest accomplishment.

So this weekend when I had to go to Port Huron for Boy Scouts, I went to where her childhood house on the river used to be. My grandpa was the commercial fisherman/bait guy where the Port Huron Coast Guard station now sits. There is a small park there, across the street from my great-grandma's house, so I walked for a bit to talk to her. I walked and told her everything.

 I still had several hours to kill before getting my son and his friends, so I went in search of rocks. Thanks to my grandfather, I am a rock-hound. Much to the dismay of my husband and children, I can easily spend hours siting and sifting through rocks on the beach. Taking the opportunity to walk along the beach, without anyone else sounded divine.

I stopped at three beaches between Port Huron and Fort Gratiot. The first one is across the street of my childhood home, and the other two were ones I have visited many times when I was a child. There was still a small ice shelf on the beach, but the sun was peeking from behind the clouds and there was little wind, making it a nice winter day.

I know what to expect in searching those beaches. Horn coral, small petosky stones, chain coral, favosite fragments, red jasper, unakite, perhaps some beach glass and maybe a puddingstone. For the first time ever I even found a puddingstone!


I was almost out of time when I visited the last beach. Although I had already found several nice Petosky stones, I asked my mom if she would help me find a really nice (big) Petoskey or puddingstone. That's when it happened. I looked down and found a tiny puddingstone with a small red jasper heart. 

I could not believe the little beauty staring back at me. I immediately picked it up and thought perhaps someone had painted the heart on a tone and left it to be found. I was right. I was painted by God and left for me to find. It was a sign from my mom that she was listening and was sending her love to me.


February 7, 2017

Valentine's Day Craft Projects for Kids and Teens

Kid's can make their Valentine a salt-dough 
heart or create other personalized craft 
creations this week at several events 
throughout Ann Arbor.

Photo courtesy of Kaboose.
When I think of Valentine's Day, I am reminded of a Valentine's Day school party in fifth grade. I passed out the typical handcrafted Valentine's Day cards to classmates and even got crafty with salt-dough, shaping it into a Valentine heart that I gave to Hank, my fifth grade crush. Unfortunately for me, even though I didn't label who the heart was from, he knew, and proceeded to tell the entire class I didn't know how to cook. Explaining that it wasn't a cookie was a fruitless effort and quite embarrassing!
Creating Valentine's Day gifts, though, became a tradition of sorts and one that I have passed to my children — everyone loves a good treat, be it baked or crafted, and this week throughout Ann Arbor, there are many opportunities for your children and teens to craft their hearts out!
Michaels Crafts is always a good location for free or low-cost "Make-it Take-it" craft projects, and this week they are not failing to deliver. On Saturday, Feb. 11 from 10:00 a.m. - noon, kids ages 3 and up can drop in to create their own Valentine's cookie. Later that same day, from 1:00-3:00 p.m. Buy blank cards in the store and create Valentine's Day cards with free craft supplies during the Michael's Make Event. 

The Ann Arbor Library has a couple events for children and teens to create sometime sweet for their sweethearts. On Saturday, Feb. 11 fat 2:00 p.m. at the Pittsfield branch, kids can create their very own Valentine's card and decoration to give to someone special. Then on Valentine's Day, be sure to stop in and learn all about chocolate. From 7:00-8:30 p.m. at the downtown library, learn about how chocolate is grown,  how to melt and temper it, and what the different percentages mean. This special event is intended for teens in grades 6 and up and adults. The event is sponsored by the People's Food Co-Op. Be sure to log into your Ann Arbor Library account to register!
Do you know of other Valentine's Day events to add to the calendar. Please share them in the comments below!


January 17, 2017

One Glove Wonder? Taking Care of Your Things

I must be the worst mom in the world tonight, or at least one that needs to re-examine disciplining her child and her own very bad reaction to a trivial problem. I actually yelled, very loudly and in a not-so-nice way, at my son for losing a glove. A glove!

I should say though, that after my son’s break-down just last week over losing one of his new Iron Man gloves, I thought he’d have learned a lesson. This entire school year I have been drilling home that his gloves and hat need to go into, and stay, in his backpack when they aren’t on his hands. So why this should even have been an issue. He’s old enough to know better. His crying and carrying on last week over this glove was terrible! I thought of telling him not to worry, since a single Iron Man glove would be of little interest to anyone. However, since the lost and found box has yet to belch out the aforementioned single missing glove, I now have to wonder if there was another little boy missing HIS Iron Man glove… But I digress.

This post is about discipline, both mine and his. It’s also about teaching a child how to care for their own things and about handling the repercussions when they don’t.

I have been asking my son to keep everything in his backpack since the start of school. I have also told him that HE is responsible for his own backpack and lunch bag. However I may have set a bad example when the dog ate through both the backpack and the lunch bag when my son left his bag out where the dog could get at it.

What did I do? Went right out and bought him a new backpack and lunch bag. I suppose I didn’t think about what message this would send my son, after all he needed both, as the backpack and the lunch bag were beyond repair. But what does that say to a child? Don’t worry mom will just buy more, right? How would it have better been handled? He did pretty well too until the missing, well-loved glove incident of last week. Mostly though this is due to my constant reminder for him to be aware of his things.

Today my son was emptying his backpack and yet again said the dreaded words, “Mom I lost a glove.” What makes this even worse is that it is actually 3 missing gloves since his (also new) Batman gloves were double-layered gloves that included two black full gloves with two fingerless gloves on top. I was going to suggest that from now on he would have to wear one Iron Man glove and the now single Batman glove, the problem is the remaining Batman glove is the fingerless one!

I told him that tomorrow he and his father would have to go out and buy two new pairs of gloves, with HIS money. I just can not discuss the gloves again. I still think I missed the mark though. My biggest concerns as a parent though are ‘why should missing one glove cause such an eruption of my emotions’ and more importantly, since it did, what will happen when my son truly does something “bad” and I get mad? I also need to consider him coming to me with his real issues; if I react so poorly won’t he choose to not come to me as a parent?

So here I am stuck between a rock and a hard place, and knowing fully well that I handled the entire situation very poorly. I know I am not alone as there are at least 20 single gloves in the lost and found that would likely produce likewise unhappy parents, I just need to re-examine my own behavior over the missing glove incident tonight as well as how to handle my son’s need for new gloves.

If you have any thoughts or suggestions, I am currently reflecting upon some of the following questions:

How do you teach your children to respect personal property? How do you teach a child the value of ‘things”? At what “age” should children be expected to be responsible for belongings? How do you discipline a child when something “necessary” is lost or damaged?

republished from annarbor.com 2010